Weather Decision Support Systems International: What We Do

The weather is an important factor that affects our personal everyday and long-term decisions. At some level, a simple decision involving what to wear on a particular day to more complicated decisions on where to live are affected by the weather. On the global scale the weather plays a large role in the success or failure of developed and emerging nations in any given year, affecting – for better or worse – every facet of commerce and life, and in some areas dictates the presence or absence of poverty and famine.

Technology plays an increasingly important role in our everyday lives and technological advances in weather and climate monitoring and forecasting are steadily advancing with new and faster technologies becoming available each and every day.  This is great news for the weather industry as it means faster computation times for models, higher resolution data observations, and better forecasts overall. Some of this technology is able to be quickly implemented, other technology takes time and expertise in a given subject matter to implement. Combining individual pieces of weather technologies in a way that assimilates and makes data and products available from instrumentation and forecasts can be a difficult and time-consuming task. This is where WDSS International comes in.

WDSS seeks to help weather service agencies and airport authorities worldwide who may not have the time or expertise necessary to implement a Weather Decision Support System for their needs. The WDSS  location at a globally recognized weather hub in Norman, Oklahoma, United States allows us to tap into the latest research and technology which is being developed and used to help save lives and property.

The WDSS office shares the campus with the National Weather Center which is home to several weather entities, both public and private. The National Weather Center houses the Storm Prediction Center (SPC), the Norman National Weather Service Forecast Office  (NWS – OUN), the Oklahoma Climate Survey which operates a data observation network termed the Oklahoma Mesonet, as well as the School of Meteorology of the University of Oklahoma. Surrounding the National Weather Center are 5 buildings which house various businesses and organizations including private weather organization and WDSS. These connections allow WDSS to access skillsets from both operational and research standpoints allowing WDSS to deliver the most up to date and useful systems possible.

Figure 1: The front of the National Weather Center in Norman, OK.

The WDSS office shares the campus with the National Weather Center which is home to several weather entities, both public and private. The National Weather Center houses the Storm Prediction Center (SPC), the Norman National Weather Service Forecast Office  (NWS – OUN), the Oklahoma Climate Survey which operates a data observation network termed the Oklahoma Mesonet, as well as the School of Meteorology of the University of Oklahoma. Surrounding the National Weather Center are 5 buildings which house various businesses and organizations including private weather organization and WDSS. These connections allow WDSS to access skillsets from both operational and research standpoints allowing WDSS to deliver the most up to date and useful systems possible.

Modeling Display
An example output from WRF, a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model installed by WDSS.

WDSS International provides three main systems to international locations:

  • Hydromet Decision Support Systems (HDSS)integrates data from weather radars, surface stations and other data sources to provide forecasters with the ability to examine and interrogate data and products
  • Mesoscale Analysis and Prediction Support System (MAPSS) – hardware, software, and displays are provided to run and view the state-of-the-science Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF) with the

SkyCast Wind and Thermodynamic Profiling System –  – instrumentation, software, and display package installed at international airport locations for detection and alerting of wind shear, inversions, and other hazards to aviation

One of the server racks installed by WDSS in the Philippines. WRF is one tool of our Mesoscale Analysis & Prediction Support System (MAPSS).

Current projects  WDSS is developing solutions for are Argentina (HDSS), Philippines (HDSS/MAPSS), United Arab Emeritus (MAPSS/SkyCast), and Thailand (MAPSS).

There is a lot going on at WDSS!  We continue to strive to bring together the best hardware, software, and weather expertise to the market by delivering cutting-edge meteorological systems. If you are in the market for such systems please contact us we can architect and deliver a custom system that meets your forecast requirements.

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